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Other Trees Similar To Cottonwood

Buy Cottonwood Trees in Helotes at Wilson Landscape Nursery

Cottonwood

If you are interested in buying or browsing Cottonwood trees in Helotes or San Antonio, Wilson Landscape has an impressive stock of all sizes and shapes of trees. We grow all of our trees from acorns and seeds and only use the best fertilizers. We have beautiful Cottonwood trees to choose from. We specialize in tree growing, and we only grown native and well adapted Texas trees, so you can be sure they will flourish. Best of all, Glenn and Sherry are plant experts and would love to answer any and all questions and concerns  about your specific tree needs. Our knowledge is something that is hard to find.  Come on in or give us a call today! 
(210) 695-2703

" Top 20" Shade Trees for  San Antonio 

Custom Plant Information By Wilson Landscape Nursery & Florist, Helotes, Texas


Welcome to Wilson's. We are glad you came our way!


​#15 Cottonwood (Populus deltoides)

Also Called "Alamo."

You have come to a great tree in your search! We at Wilson's hope that you find this plant information to be helpful and interesting. Let us know if we can help you further as you search for that perfect tree. Our information is based upon decades of loving trees, learning about trees, growing trees, maintaining trees, talking about trees, selling trees, planting trees, watching trees grow, enjoying the beauty of trees and being grateful to God for creating trees!


"The Lord God made all kinds of trees grow out of the ground--trees that were pleasing to the eye and good for food." "And God saw that it was good." (Genesis 2:9; 1:12)


Strengths And Weaknesses Listed

All trees have strengths and weaknesses. In order to thoroughly evaluate a tree, you should consider both. Let me begin by offering some strengths of Cottonwood trees and then I will describe some weaknesses. You will be happy to discover that this trees strengths overcome its weaknesses. In fact, from our viewpoint, Cottonwood makes our "Top 20" list.


Cottonwood Has Gotten A Bad Rap
I refuse to jump on the bandwagon of those who bad mouth this beautiful tree. As I drive around the Hill Country and San Antonio area, one of the trees that always gets my attention is the lovely Cottonwood! I sometimes wish we would just change the common name to “Texas Aspen,” since it is related. Then, maybe we would plant more of them and I might sell a few. Plenty of people ask about them, but when I say the name Cottonwood, some turn away. Why has the Cottonwood gotten such a bad rap? The most frequent complaints are the “cottony” seeds and the shallow root system. But the Cottonwood makes up for these weaknesses with its beautiful leaves, majestic form, drought tolerance and fast growth.


The Alamo Named After Cottonwood Trees

Cottonwood trees have historical importance, especially for people who live in San Antonio. Dr. Frank B. Flanders wrote this article for the Georgia Agricultural Education Curriculum. It is an interesting article about Cottonwood trees and the Alamo of which I will share:


“The Cottonwood tree is linked by blood and name to the Battle of the Alamo. The Spanish word for Cottonwood is “Alamo” . . .The Spanish established the Alamo as a mission, first called San Antonio de Valero. The Valero mission came to be known as the “Alamo” because of a large grove of Cottonwoods growing there” He goes on to tell how Santa Anna used wood from those Cottonwood trees to burn the bodies of the defenders of the Alamo for three days. Tell that story the next time they put down your Cottonwood tree!

Cottonwoods Make Pretty Places
The native Americans and earliest settlers must have appreciated the beauty of Cottonwood trees. They chose pleasant places to live where there was abundant water, timber and farm able land nearby. That's what brought them to the beautiful area of what is now downtown San Antonio.

Strengths: Sight And Sound of Cottonwoods Blowing In the Wind
As I look out my window I see the leaves of a Cottonwood blowing in the wind. It is one of the first strong cold fronts of October and the tree still has all of its leaves. The leaves are a medium green to lighter green color. They look healthy and bright as the sun reflects and shines through them. The leaves are shaped triangular at the top but more rounded and plump at the middle. They have small toothed edges. Even a light wind can cause these leaves to flutter or quiver in the wind. This is how Cottonwood's cousin the “Quaking Aspen” got its nickname. The botanical name of Cottonwoods close cousin, the Aspen tree brings this out. Its name is Populus tremuloides. Notice the “tremuloides” part of the name which refers to its trembling leaves. It is the “quaking” or rustling sound of the leaf blowing in the wind. A Cottonwood blowing in the breeze has a cooling sound and gives the illusion of rain. Its a nice tree to sit by on a hot dry day.

Why the Leaves Flutter
Of course, all trees make sound as their leaves blow in the wind but the Cottonwood is a master at it. All trees have stems that connect to leaves. On some trees these stems (petioles) are shorter. When these stems are shorter they tend to hold the individual leaf in place more firmly since these stems are closer to the main, more stable branch, from which they emerge. But the Cottonwood has a long flat stem. Its leaf is further away from the main branch-- out there. This allows more movement. Cottonwood's long flat stem also channels wind to the leaf. Even a gentle breeze causes the leaf to flutter and it really get going as the wind gets stronger. This increased wind flow also helps the tree to disperse its seeds more efficiently. What that means for us is that leaves fluttering in the wind are pretty to look at and pleasant to hear. If you like the “Quaking Poplar” (Populus tremuloides) of Colorado called Aspen you will also like the “Quaking Poplar” of Texas called Cottonwood.

Strength: #1 Fastest Grower
People often request a tree that grows fast. Well the Cottonwood wins the race on our Top List. The Sycamores are close behind. You can expect six feet of growth per year. In seven years you will have a forty foot high tree! That's the kind of kind of size that can really make a difference in your own backyard. You'll have shade and beauty before you know it! You will hear and see the beautiful Cottonwood blowing in the wind and wonder why no one else has made the same discovery.

Strength: Fall Foliage
Cottonwood is one of the few trees that gives us beautiful yellow fall foliage. We have several trees that offer us orange and red. There is the Flameleaf Sumac, the Texas Ash, the Chinese Pistache, the Red Oak and the Bigtooth Maple. For some of these yellow is the prelude to their climax colors of orange and red. But the Cottonwood, like its Rocky Mountain cousin, the Aspen, offers us that bright yellow fall foliage. Escarpment Cherry and Cedar Elm also offer some nice yellow color.

Weaknesses
All trees have weaknesses and strengths. In order to thoroughly evaluate a tree, you should consider both. You will be happy to discover that this trees strengths overcome its weaknesses!

Weakness: Shallow Root System
Cottonwood trees develop some roots that are more visible near the surface of the ground. This is because Cottonwoods often grow in areas that flood. They have adapted a more shallow root system to ensure that their roots get adequate oxygen. You can cover these roots with soil to improve the appearance and also help your lawn and tree grow better. Cottonwood trees are not the only trees with shallow roots. Actually, most trees have shallow root systems. Most feeder roots of the trees on our list are in the first two feet of soil. Many of these roots penetrate the soil up near the very surface competing with turf grass for those topsoil nutrients and water, although not are not usually visible.

Weakness: Cottony Seed Mess
The most frequent complaint about Cottonwood trees is their seeds covered in a cotton like fluff. Only the female trees shed which can last for a week or two and be a little difficult to clean up. The key is to buy a male tree without this problem. This fluff is not particularly allergenic, as some people may think.

Cottonwood Trees For Sale At Wilson's
Each year we usually have a good supply of Cottonwood trees. Typically these are sold as 5 gallon, 15 gallon, 30 gallon and 45 gallon. Larger trees are occasionally available as well. Our Cottonwood trees were grown from cutting made from two beautiful trees growing on a local Hill Country creek just down the road from our nursery.

A Blessing For You

We hope that this plant information helps you as you search for that perfect tree. Whichever tree you choose, may it bring you many years of beauty and peace.


May you and your tree be "like a tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit in season and whose leaf does not wither." (Psalm 1:3)


If you are interested in buying or browsing Cottonwood trees in Helotes or San Antonio, Wilson Landscape has an impressive stock of all sizes and shapes of trees. We grow all of our trees from acorns and seeds and only use the best fertilizers. We have beautiful Cottonwood trees to choose from. We specialize in tree growing, and we only grown native and well adapted Texas trees, so you can be sure they will flourish. Best of all, Glenn and Sherry are plant experts and would love to answer any and all questions and concerns  about your specific tree needs. Our knowledge is something that is hard to find.  Come on in or give us a call today! 
(210) 695-2703











Populus deltoides